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Daily News

September 25, 2000

Sept. 25, 2000 -- The second phase of a theater missile defense simulation exercise examining what elements are needed for a complete, single integrated air picture begins today and will continue through the end of the week, a Joint Staff official told InsideDefense.com.

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Sept. 25, 2000 -- Boeing flew its Joint Strike Fighter demonstrator for the second time Saturday, five days after its first flight. The flight had been delayed two days due to high winds.

Boeing test pilot Fred Knox flew the X-32A aircraft for 50 minutes, a half hour longer than the first flight. The demonstrator flew to an altitude of 10,000 feet at 200 miles per hour.

A minor hydraulic leak in the aircraft cut short the first flight, but a Boeing spokesman told InsideDefense.com the "seal that had bulged out" was fixed in 15 minutes.

(454 words)

September 22, 2000

Sept. 22, 2000 -- The American Shipbuilding Association this week protested legislation proposed by a top Pentagon office that would allow the defense secretary to waive U.S. laws requiring that certain Navy ships be built in the United States.

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Sept. 22, 2000 -- The Central Intelligence Agency's point man for monitoring ballistic missile proliferation acknowledged yesterday that diverging opinions have emerged this year within the intelligence community on Iran's ability to flight test a long-range ballistic missile by 2005.

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Sept. 22, 2000 -- Tensions on the Korean peninsula are likely to remain high for the foreseeable future despite recent indications that relations between North and South Korea may be thawing, according to a new Pentagon report to Congress.

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Sept. 22, 2000 -- The House of Representatives yesterday approved a conference report on legislation that would authorize $7.7 billion to fund training for foreign military personnel.

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September 21, 2000

Sept. 21, 2000 -- The Navy announced yesterday that it has awarded the advertising firm of Campbell-Ewald a $330 million contract for recruiting-related ads.

Campbell-Ewald, based in Detroit, "brings a great diversity of talent and professional expertise," said Vice Adm. Norb Ryan, chief of naval personnel, in a Defense Department statement.

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Sept. 21, 2000 -- A Predator unmanned aerial vehicle was destroyed last week when it crashed during a preliminary test in support of the Air Force's effort to weaponize the system, sources said.

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Sept. 21, 2000 -- Key military officials from three of the four services told a congressional panel today they largely agree with a recently released Congressional Budget Office report that pegs the estimated procurement cost of maintaining a "steady" force at about $90 billion annually.

However, Army Lt. Gen. Larry Ellis, deputy chief of staff for operations and plans, said his service's procurement request for fiscal year 2001 is underfunded by $5 billion, not the $15 billion suggested in the CBO report.

(694 words)

September 20, 2000

Sept. 20, 2000 -- Raytheon Aerospace has won a $79.6 million contract for maintenance and logistics support of the Navy's T-34C and T-44A aircraft, the Defense Department announced yesterday.

The deal was competitively procured via an electronic request for proposals, DOD said, but seven solicited proposals produced only one offer.

Raytheon builds both aircraft.

The T-44A is a twin-engine plane used to provide Navy pilots with advanced maritime flight training. The T-34C is a single-engine plane used for student pilot training.

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Sept. 20, 2000 -- The Defense Department and the American Bankers Association yesterday signed a "statement of support" for members of the National Guard and Reserve.

In an announcement, DOD said the statement pledges support from the ABA's 6,000 corporate members for employees who serve in the reserves. The statement "also declares ABA's recognition that the National Guard and Reserve are essential to the strength of our nation and the well being of our communities."

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ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MD, Sept. 20, 2000 -- A newly released independent report on the feasibility of destroying non-stockpile chemical materiel at eight sites around the country will not affect the Army's chemical demilitarization program, a service official said Tuesday.

The independent report, which was requested by the House Armed Services Committee in April, is only a first look at whether non-stockpile materiel already at the eight sites could be eliminated within existing resources, NSCM Product Manager Lt. Col. Christopher Ross told InsideDefense.com.

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Sept. 20, 2000 -- The Defense Department today awarded a $195.7 million contract for a new Abrams tank engine to a Honeywell-General Electric team, the only bidder to propose a turbine engine.

The move paves the way for the Honeywell-GE team to reap billions of dollars worth of future production contracts for more than 2,500 U.S. tanks. In addition, the engine will be prepared for inclusion in the Army's next-generation self-propelled howitzer system, Crusader.

(530 words)

September 19, 2000

Sept. 19, 2000 -- Engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney has been chosen to provide roughly $850 million in new engines and sustainment work for U.S. and U.K. C-17 airlifters, the company announced this week.

The engine builder received two separate awards from C-17 prime contractor Boeing yesterday and today. The larger is valued at more than $750 million for Air Force C-17 engine support and sustainment through 2005, the company said in a statement.

(468 words)

Sept. 19, 2000 -- Engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney has been chosen to provide roughly $850 million in new engines and sustainment work for U.S. and U.K. C-17 airlifters, the company announced this week. The engine builder received two separate awards from C-17 prime contractor Boeing yesterday and today. The larger is valued at more than $750 million for Air Force C-17 engine support and sustainment through 2005, the company said in a statement.

(466 words)

Sept. 19, 2000 -- Engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney has been chosen to provide roughly $850 million in new engines and sustainment work for U.S. and U.K. C-17 airlifters, the company announced this week. The engine builder received two separate awards from C-17 prime contractor Boeing yesterday and today. The larger is valued at more than $750 million for Air Force C-17 engine support and sustainment through 2005, the company said in a statement.

(464 words)

Sept. 19, 2000 -- Engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney has been chosen to provide roughly $850 million in new engines and sustainment work for U.S. and U.K. C-17 airlifters, the company announced this week. The engine builder received two separate awards from C-17 prime contractor Boeing yesterday and today. The larger is valued at more than $750 million for Air Force C-17 engine support and sustainment through 2005, the company said in a statement.

(462 words)

Sept. 19, 2000 -- Engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney has been chosen to provide roughly $850 million in new engines and sustainment work for U.S. and U.K. C-17 airlifters, the company announced this week. The engine builder received two separate awards from C-17 prime contractor Boeing yesterday and today. The larger is valued at more than $750 million for Air Force C-17 engine support and sustainment through 2005, the company said in a statement.

(460 words)

Sept. 19, 2000 -- Engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney has been chosen to provide roughly $850 million in new engines and sustainment work for U.S. and U.K. C-17 airlifters, the company announced this week. The engine builder received two separate awards from C-17 prime contractor Boeing yesterday and today. The larger is valued at more than $750 million for Air Force C-17 engine support and sustainment through 2005, the company said in a statement.

(458 words)

Sept. 19, 2000 -- Engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney has been chosen to provide roughly $850 million in new engines and sustainment work for U.S. and U.K. C-17 airlifters, the company announced this week. The engine builder received two separate awards from C-17 prime contractor Boeing yesterday and today. The larger is valued at more than $750 million for Air Force C-17 engine support and sustainment through 2005, the company said in a statement.

(456 words)

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